Courses

Course Coordinator:
Thomas Busch
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Physics
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

While the fundamental concepts of atomic physics and quantum mechanics that are required will be reviewed in the beginning of the course, basic prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is required (e.g. A216 & A217).

Companion course to A211 Advances in Atomic Physics

The course will start out by introducing the fundamental ideas for cooling and trapping ultracold atoms and review the quantum mechanical framework that underlies the description of interacting matter waves in the ultracold regime. This will introduce the idea of degenerate Bose and Fermi gases, and in particular the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation.

Course Coordinator:
Ichiro Masai
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
2
Credits:
2

This course introduces fundamental principles and key concepts in the developmental processes of animal organisms, by focusing on Drosophila embryonic development and vertebrate neural development as models, and will facilitate graduate students to reach a professional level of understanding of developmental biology. Furthermore, genetic tools for live imaging of fluorescence-labeled cells using Drosophila and zebrafish embryos will be introduced as practical exercises.

Course Coordinator:
Noriyuki Satoh
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
3
Credits:
2

The course presents the most recent theory and techniques in evolutionary and developmental biology with an emphasis on the underlying molecular genomics. Recent advances in decoding the genomes of various animals, plants and microbes will be followed, with a discussion on comparative genomics, the evolution of transcription factors and signal transaction molecules and their relation to the evolution of the various complex body plans present through history.

Course Coordinator:
Yoko Yazaki-Sugiyama
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Neuroscience
Term:
2
Credits:
2

The course provides an understanding of the neuronal mechanisms that underlie animal behavior. We will study the neuronal mechanisms for specialized animal behaviors such as sensory processing, motor pattern generation, and learning by reading original papers, which also provide an understanding of experimental technique. The course further discusses the evolutionary strategy and the biological ideas of animal behavior and underlying neuronal mechanisms.

Course Coordinator:
Tadashi Yamamoto
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
1
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Requires at least advanced undergraduate level Cell Biology and Genetics or similar background knowledge

This course consists of lectures and exercises. First, students learn, through lectures, recent progress in cancer research and the mechanism of carcinogenesis based on the molecular and cellular functions of oncogenes and anti-oncogenes. Further, students will learn the relevance of signal transduction, cell cycle progression, cell adhesion, and gene regulation to tumor development and are encouraged to simulate effective methods of diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

Course Coordinator:
Hidetoshi Saze
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
3
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Requires at least advanced undergraduate level Cell Biology and Genetics or similar background knowledge

Epigenetic regulation of gene activity is essential for development and response to environmental changes in living organisms. This course introduces fundamental principles and key concepts of epigenetics, and original research publications contributed to understanding the mechanism underlying the epigenetic phenomena will be reviewed. Lecturers from outside OIST may be invited for specific topics.

Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Requires B06 Cell Biology (or knowledge of gene regulation processes, cell division and recombinant DNA) and B03 Mathematics I  (or higher, preferably).

Ideally taken with A301 Signal Transduction.

“What does this experiment tell us?” and “Can I actually use this data for the model I am trying to construct?” These are two prototypical questions from students who wish to conduct research associated with molecular biology, but have little or no experience with the techniques. This course will answer such questions in the context of commonly used experimental approaches. The course will not include any hands-on training with laboratory equipment.

Course Coordinator:
Erik De Schutter
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Neuroscience
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Requires prior computational methods, programming, mathematics, and neuroscience (OIST course B05 Neurobiology is acceptable) or similar background knowledge.

Computational neuroscience has a rich history going back to the original Hodgkin-Huxley model of the action potential and the work of Wilfrid Rall on cable theory and passive dendrites. More recently networks consisting of simple integrate-and-fire neurons have become popular. Nowadays standard simulator software exists to apply these modeling methods, which can then be used to interpret and predict experimental findings.

Course Coordinator:
Mitsuhiro Yanagida
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Requires at least advanced undergraduate level Cell Biology and Genetics or similar background knowledge

Cells undergo aging and have limited lifespans. This lecture course covers the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that control cellular aging and that affect the lengths of organismal lifespans. Various strategies for investigating human longevity are also discussed.

Course Coordinator:
Izumi Fukunaga
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Neuroscience
Term:
3
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

The course is aimed at students with a background in neuroscience (either at the BSc/MSc level or having successfully completed some of the basic neuroscience course offered at OIST). It assumes knowledge in cellular neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. Most relevant courses at OIST will include: B05 (Neurobiology; requirement), A405 (Emerging technologies in life sciences; desirable), B09 (Learning and behaviour; desirable), A310 (Computational neuroscience; highly desirable). B05 is the most important (in terms of subject matters listed on the course’s website), so a pass in this course will be a pre-requisite.

The course will cover general concepts and specific modalities as detailed in the table below. Classes alternate between a lecture-style teaching and a journal club. Each lecture will be based on a textbook chapter (Kandel et al’s Principles of Neural Sciences, in combination with other, specialised books described in the “Textbooks” section) to cover basic and broad topics, but will also serve as an opportunity to introduce concepts required to understand the research article associated with the lecture.