Courses

Course Coordinator:
Keshav Dani
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Physics
Term:
1
Credits:
2

This course will be an introductory graduate level course to initiate students into the techniques of ultrafast spectroscopy. They will be introduced to the basic concepts underlying sub-picosecond phenomena in nature (ultrafast chemical processes, femtosecond electron dynamics in materials, etc.) and the tools used to study such phenomena (pump-probe spectroscopy, Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy, etc.).

Course Coordinator:
Thomas Busch
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Physics
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

A201 Quantum Mechanics, companion course to A204 Condensed Matter

Advanced course in Quantum Mechanics, based on recent theoretical and experimental advances. Evolution in Hilbert space and quantum bits; conditional quantum dynamics; quantum simulations; quantum Fourier transform and quantum search algorithms; ion-trap and NMR experiments; quantum noise and master equations; Hilbert space distances; Von Neumann entropy; Holevo bound; entanglement as a physical resource; quantum cryptography; lab: quantum eraser, interaction free measurement.

Course Coordinator:
Síle Nic Chormaic
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Physics
Term:
2
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

A201 Quantum Mechanics, companion course to A203 Advanced Optics, A210 Advanced Quantum Mechanics

Advanced level course in atomic physics.   Progress in laser control of atoms has led to the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates, ultrafast time and frequency standards and the ability to develop quantum technologies. In this course we will cover the essentials of atomic physics including resonance phenomena, atoms in electric and magnetic fields, and light-matter interactions.   This leads to topics relevant in current research such as laser cooling and trapping.

Course Coordinator:
Amy Shen
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Physics
Term:
3
Credits:
2
Prior Knowledge:

Either A202 Fluid Dynamics  or B13 Fluid Mechanics

The interface between engineering and miniaturization is among the most intriguing and active areas of inquiry in modern technology. The aim of this course is to illuminate and explore microfluidics as an interdisciplinary research area, with an emphasis on emerging microfluidics disciplines, including molecular assembly to bulk and device level scales, with applications in novel materials synthesis, bio-microtechnology and nanotechnology.

Course Coordinator:
Julia Khusnutdinova
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Chemistry
Term:
1
Credits:
2

In this course, students will learn basic principles of electrochemistry with a particular focus on redox behavior of transition metals including metalloproteins. Modern research in application of transition metal complexes for renewable energy storage and production will be highlighted and discussed in detail, including metal-catalyzed water oxidation, proton reduction and CO2 reduction processes. The course will provide practical training in voltammetric techniques and spectroelectrochemistry, and analysis and simulation of cyclic voltammetry data.

Course Coordinator:
Yohei Yokobayashi
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Chemistry
Term:
2
Credits:
2

In this course, students will learn basic principles of nucleic acid chemistry and engineering through lectures and discussions. The students will then use the basic knowledge to deepen their understanding of the current research in the field of nucleic acid chemistry and engineering. Finally, the students will design, construct, and characterize functional nucleic acids in the laboratory while learning basic experimental skills to manipulate nucleic acids.

 
Course Coordinator:
Ye Zhang
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Chemistry
Term:
3
Credits:
2

Materials chemistry is emerging as an interdisciplinary field that involves knowledge from diverse science and engineering research fields. The recent public attention and enthusiasm on nanoscience and nanotechnology not only underscores the importance of interdisciplinary research, but also highlights the promises of materials chemistry. The development of modern chemistry allows chemists to precisely control the three-dimension arrangement of many atoms for developing novel materials.

Course Coordinator:
Ichiro Masai
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
2
Credits:
2

This course introduces fundamental principles and key concepts in the developmental processes of animal organisms, by focusing on Drosophila embryonic development and vertebrate neural development as models, and will facilitate graduate students to reach a professional level of understanding of developmental biology. Furthermore, genetic tools for live imaging of fluorescence-labeled cells using Drosophila and zebrafish embryos will be introduced as practical exercises.

Course Coordinator:
Noriyuki Satoh
Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
3
Credits:
2

The course presents the most recent theory and techniques in evolutionary and developmental biology with an emphasis on the underlying molecular genomics. Recent advances in decoding the genomes of various animals, plants and microbes will be followed, with a discussion on comparative genomics, the evolution of transcription factors and signal transaction molecules and their relation to the evolution of the various complex body plans present through history.

Course Type:
Elective
Course Category:
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
Term:
3
Credits:
2

The course introduces you to modern microbiology with a focus on its applications in environmental science and biotechnology. With the availability of high-throughput sequencing technology, enormous amounts of genome data and various “omics” approaches, microbiology has entered a new era. Besides the many new insights in microbial diversity and interactions with other organisms, the new experimental and computational approaches are offering completely new applications in different fields of biotechnology.